Broken Spirits Become Stronger Saints

God Makes Art from our Broken Pots. Photo:  https://www.pinterest.com/pengiunv/broken-pots/

God Makes Art from our Broken Pots. Photo:
https://www.pinterest.com/pengiunv/broken-pots/

“The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit;

A broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.” Psalm 51:17 ESV

Salvation starts with our broken spirit over our sin before a holy God.  We know we need Jesus’s blood appropriated to our sins.  We ask. We receive.  And we start a whole new life as a Christian.

We soon learn salvation is the start point for the ongoing part of sanctification.  A broken spirit before God is not a one-time experience.  We see another part of ourselves that doesn’t line up with God’s purposes and we repent over this newly revealed sin or sin pattern.  We ask God to break this sin off of us.  He does and then we progress forward in our walk.  All the while, God is breaking us from sins and sin patterns.  What starts to emerge is the person God is shaping.  We increasingly align with His ways.  Then we align with His purposes.  We become the person God can use in the destiny He has ordained for us from the beginning of time.

 

There is such a thing as the breaker anointing.  We want this when we need to break through into a new pattern, or a new season, or a new path for our lives.  Often we see that God has been breaking things off, or in, a person for this new step forward.

 

I come from a very self-driven and self-motivated operational style point.  People use these terms on resumes.  I operated like this before I even knew the term.  Sometimes, my fellow high school students failed to do their part in group projects. So I decided to do the extra work to get the “A.”  I really wanted the grade, so I wasn’t going to depend on mediocrity.  If people couldn’t be relied upon to transport me to practice when I needed to be there, I found other ways to arrange to be there.  In the business world, I would get projects done that other people said couldn’t happen.  They were surpised. Yet, the projects happened.

This all worked well for me until the Lord started to break this independent spirit.  He calls us into unity.  He calls us into relationship with other people.  I was surprised to learn that it wasn’t always about the merits of the project.  It started to be about the people on the project.  It was my time to learn to work with all types of people.  I had to learn how to be vulnerable when it hadn’t been safe to be so in the past. They had to work with me and my flaws.  I had to learn how to trust different styles and personalities.  My attitudes and style points started to crack open.  I had to learn how to work with many various strengths and weaknesses. This took more time.  It took more energy.  It took new communication skills. I learned the importance of spoken and unspoken dialogues to get a team on board with common objectives.  I had to learn how to develop honor for all people.  I had to learn how to prioritize differently and accommodate for people’s life issues.  The goals for projects included people dimensions I had never bothered to consider before.

Part of this is maturity and growing up.  True.  But part of this is breaking my spirit to care and work with all kinds of people. The Lord and I had a side dialogue going on concurrently.  He pointed out spiritual truths from scriptures that He would show me at just the right time in my devotions. Or I would tune into nuggets from sermons I just happened to hear.  God was making me a stronger saint by breaking my independent spirit.  I learned that God’s plan is to make us better together.

As we break bread together, and wash it down with the wine of communion, it might be a time to ask God what He wants to break in us.  As this breaks off, we wash it with the cleansing blood of forgiveness and sanctification. Communion is that time to allow God to do the work He wants to do in us.

What does God want to break in me to move forward as a stronger saint?


Related Posts



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>